Abigail Beckman

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

Abigail grew up in Palmer Lake, Co. She has a bachelor's degree in Mass Communications and Spanish as well as a Master's degree in communications. Previously, she worked for the Dodge City Daily Globe in Dodge City, Kan. and for 89.1 KMUW in Wichita Kan.

Abigail's work has been featured on NPR's "Only A Game," "Weekend Edition Sunday," "Morning Edition," and "All Things Considered." In 2015, she wrote and produced the radio documentary "The Pieces that Remain: Remembering the Wichita State University Plane Crash" and was honored with a Gracie Award from the Alliance for Women in Media and a regional Edward R. Murrow Award. Abigail also earned a national Edward R. Murrow award for a feature titled "Reaching Out: The Ongoing Relationship Between the WPD and the Homeless." 

In addition to her love for public radio, Abigail enjoys hiking, spending time with her husband and two fur-babies, doing yoga and watching reruns of Family Feud.

Ways to Connect

Thomas Hart / Flickr Creative Commons

The economic outlook for Colorado Springs and El Paso County continues to be positive. According to a forecast by Dr. Tatiana Bailey with the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, the gross metropolitan product (GMP) is expected to grow faster than the national GDP by about 1 percent, as it has steadily done for the past few years. 

Abigail Beckman / 91.5 KRCC

For a few hours on Sunday, October 7th, vehicles were not allowed Garden of the Gods. A gloomy, crisp morning didn’t keep people away from the park’s second so-called Motorless Morning. Bikers, runners and walkers roamed freely throughout the park, appreciating the landscape and the wildlife—and no one seemed to miss the traffic. 91.5 KRCC’s Abigail Beckman was there and has this audio postcard...

Jake Brownell / 91.5 KRCC

This Sunday morning, Garden of the Gods will once again be closed to vehicles. Motorless Morning is an opportunity for cyclists and pedestrians to take in the park without the sounds, commotion and worry of traffic. 

National Park Service

The National Park Service is donating more funds to preserve, restore and increase education about Japanese American internment camps scattered across the U.S.  Most of them are in the West. 

A new campaign aimed at reducing the stigma surrounding men’s mental health is underway in El Paso County. The initiative is called Man Therapy and it uses humor to cut through what experts say is a tendency among men to avoid seeking help.

Tyler Hill / KRCC

Colorado Springs spends less money on its parks than the national average, according to an annual report from the Trust for Public Land. The analysis compared the 100 largest cities in the United States. 

https://pg-cloud.com/ColoradoSpringsCO/

Picture the street where you live. Now imagine that same street without any trees. Just homes, maybe a sidewalk, asphalt. Does that change your perception? Dennis Will thinks it would. He’s the interim city forester for the Colorado Springs Parks and Recreation Department.

Photo Courtesy of Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

The Cheyenne Mountain Zoo says two additional animals were killed in a hail storm early this week that caused significant damage and injured animals and people. In a press release, Jenny Koch, the zoo’s marketing director, said a meerkat pup that was missing underground has not been recovered, and they assume it has passed away.

“One of our peacocks also passed due to hail injuries,” Koch said.

Courtesy Colorado Department of Agriculture

The Colorado State Fair has a new general manager this year. Scott Stoller was appointed by the Colorado Department of Agriculture, and started his new role at the beginning of July. Stoller comes from the Silver Dollar Fair in Chico, California where he managed all aspects of the fair. 91.5 KRCC’s Abigail Beckman sat down with him to discuss his new job.

Spring Fire 2018 Facebook page / Rocky Mountain Indicident Management

The Spring Fire in southern Colorado is now 105,704 acres and 35% contained. The Colorado Department of Transportation anticipates reopening Highway 160 on Saturday at 2:00 p.m. Colorado 12 will remain closed from La Veta to the summit of Cuchara Pass. Colorado Highway 69 will remain closed to all except local traffic; proof of residence is required. Some evacuation notices in Huerfano County have been lifted.

Courtesy Spring Fire 2018 Facebook page

The Spring Fire continues to grow quickly, with reports showing a burn area of more than 94,125 acres. That's an increase of 10,000 acres since previously reported. Containment has remained steady at 5%. Most of the land is under private ownership, while state and federal lands are also affected.

@CSP_Alamosa/Twitter

The total acreage burned by the Spring Fire continues to grow. As of Tuesday morning, officials say 78,941 acres, more than 120 square miles has been effect. The containment level of the fire decreased to 5% Tuesday, down from 10% the day before. 104 homes are confirmed destroyed.

courtesy Colorado Department of Transportation

Update 5:39 p.m., Friday 6/29/18: In Huerfano County, mandatory evacuations are in place for residents in Tres Valles, Paradise Acres, Raspberry Mountain, Pine Haven, and the Cuchara Valley. At this time, La Veta is not part of the mandatory evacuation but remains on pre-evacuation notice. 

Any large animals being held at the 4H barn in La Veta can stay, but a secondary location is open at the Las Animas County Fairgrounds.

Mark Goebel, Flickr Creative Commons

A recent report ranks Pueblo as one of the worst cities in the country to live in. The study was done by New York-based 24/7 Wall Street. Results were based on quality of life factors like crime, the economy and education. Out of the 50 cities ranked, Pueblo came in 17th.

Jeff Shaw, President of the Pueblo Economic Development Corporation, says the report leaves a lot to be desired.

National Archives and Records Administration

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed in February 1848, bringing an official end to the Mexican-American War. Among other things, it moved the southern boundary of the U.S. to the Rio Grande River, instead of the Arkansas River. Part of the original treaty is on display at the El Pueblo History Museum in Pueblo.

History professor Dr. Fawn Amber Montoya coordinates Chicano Studies at Colorado State University-Pueblo. 91.5 KRCC's Abigail Beckman spoke with Montoya about the implications of the treaty, which drastically changed the lives of the people living in this region.

Laura Bittner / Flickr/Creative Commons

Ballots for the 2018 Primary Election are arriving in voter's mailboxes this week. There is a change in the process this year, though, as unaffiliated voters are now able to cast votes in the primary. El Paso County Clerk and Recorder Chuck Broerman shares details what voters should expect. 

Mike McBride / Flickr-Creative Commons

Colorado's juvenile justice system will undergo a comprehensive review over the next six months. The goal is to bolster efforts to help keep youth out of the system as well as improve outcomes for those already in it.

Fremont County Sheriff's Department

Fire season is here again. Coming up over the next few days 91.5 KRCC will be introducing you to some of the people on the frontlines—and that doesn't just mean firefighters and smokejumpers. The series from the Mountain West News Bureau will focus on the people behind the scenes.

Nate Hegyi is a reporter based in Montana with the Mountain West News Bureau.

On who will be included in the series: