Chloe Brookskistler / 91.5 KRCC

Public libraries are a place to find answers—maybe for a research question or a book recommendation. But they’re increasingly places where people seek help locating social services, benefits and housing. And to better meet those needs, libraries across the country are adding social workers to their payroll. As of October, that includes the Pikes Peak Library District.

One year after the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., the urgency for new gun restrictions has declined, but roughly half the country is concerned a mass shooting could happen at a school in their community, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds.

In the immediate aftermath of the mass shooting that killed 17 people on Valentine's Day, 71 percent of Americans said laws covering the sale of firearms should be stricter. Now, it's 51 percent.

Clip Art Library

The Valentine Day's edition of 91.5 KRCC's music newsletter is an up close and personal view of the tender hearts who work at your favorite radio station.  Let love rule!

Jake Brownell - (Reporter/Producer) - Leonard Cohen - "Hey, That's No Way To Say Goodbye" - I'm not sure if this a love song or a break up song, but it's romantic all the same.

Jeff Bieri - (Program Manager/On-Air Host/Voice) - Muddy Waters - "I Want To Be Loved"  - A poignant plea. Umm, I'm not kidding....

Shawn Rosvold - (Morning Edition/All Things Considered On-Air Host) - The Jefferson Airplane - "Comin' Back To Me" - It takes me back to my first love.  That person you will never forget.

Judd Irish Bradley

New York City third wave ska band, The Toasters, warm up the winter night on Sunday, February 24 at the Black Sheep in Colorado Springs.  Known for their high energy shows and masterful blending of r&b, pop, rap and calypso with off beat rhythms and walking basslines, The Toasters will host one amazing dance party.

Tickets are available at the door or buy online at www.BlackSheepRocks.com.  Listen for guest list giveaways on 91.5 KRCC's evening music mix.

Longmont resident Ingrid Moore went to the state Capitol on Tuesday carrying a stack of maps she said illustrates why Colorado should change the way it chooses U.S. presidents.

"Over 57 percent of all the 2016 campaign events were held in just four states," she said as lawmakers on the House State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee reviewed the map. "Virtually all campaign events ... were held in just 12 states. And those 12 states just have 30 percent of the population."

The U.S. Senate overwhelmingly passed landmark legislation Tuesday to expand recreation access and conserve public lands nationwide. Passage of the Natural Resources Act stood out not just because it tackled a big challenge — the permanent authorization of the popular Land and Water Conservation Fund — but also because of the strength of bipartisan support that propelled the omnibus package beyond the politics of division.

During the partial shutdown, the National Park Service said it was using visitor entrance fees for basic operational costs. That's now changed following a congressional hearing last week by Democratic lawmakers criticizing the use of visitor fees for daily operations. Traditionally, these fees are used for more long-term or major maintenance projects.

More than 10,000 special education students will be "extremely impacted" by the Denver teacher strike, a new class action lawsuit alleges. The suit, brought on behalf of the students against the school district — on the first day of the strike — argues that without trained teachers and caregivers, the students will be put in jeopardy.

A cell phone, two good samaritans and a Facebook page helped Denver Police find the man suspected of breaking into the state Capitol last month and damaging several statues.

On Friday, police arrested Elias Anthony Dominguez, 26, on suspicion of burglary. According to an arrest affidavit, Dominguez allegedly entered the Capitol through a faulty security door just after 2 a.m. on Jan. 27 and started breaking chairs, glass display cabinets and bronze busts of former politicians.

Friday six former African-American football players from the University of Wyoming's team reunited after almost fifty years to be honored on UW's campus.

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