91.5 KRCC Music

91.5 KRCC Music - every night from 7pm to midnight.

MUSIC MAKES LIFE BETTER...

Tune in every night from 7pm to midnight!

Host Schedule:
Vicky:  7pm-10pm M-F
Volunteer DJs:  10pm -midnight M-Sat
Blue Plate Special:  7pm-8pm Sat
Vintage Voltage:  8pm-10pm Sat
Jazz Excursion:  7pm-10pm Sun
Reggae w/Ron:  10pm-midnight Sun

Check here for event and concert listings, updates, music reviews, top albums in our playlist and more from Vicky, Jeff and our volunteer DJs.

Listen to 91.5 KRCC Music anytime! Just go to our Music on Demand website for Vicky's show, our great volunteer DJs, Blue Plate Special, Vintage Voltage, Jazz Excursion and Reggae with Ron.

Sign up for the weekly 91.5 KRCC Music Newsletter for concert and album reviews, free music downloads, concert calendar and more.

Want to SEE the best new music performances in public radio? Visit VuHaus - 91.5 KRCC Music is a partner featuring Colorado music.

via YouTube

Plugged In is a limited-run web series for 91.5 KRCC Music in which contributors from Colorado College's student radio station, The SOCC, tip us off to great new releases, under-the-radar favorites, and other music they can't live without.

More than three decades after ABBA broke up, the Swedish band's four members — Agnetha, Benny, Björn and Anni-Frid — have announced that they've been back in the studio together and have recorded two new songs.

When someone once asked Nando Chang if he was into Tupac, the Peruvian American hip-hop fan thought the reference was to Tupac Amaru, a legendary Incan warrior.

Larry Harvey, co-founder of the Burning Man festival, died Saturday at the age of 70, according to the organization's Facebook page and website.

The first Burning Man event took place on a San Francisco beach in 1986 after Harvey had the idea to burn a giant effigy in celebration. The event eventually grew into the seminal arts and culture festival in Nevada's Black Rock Desert marked by the burning of a giant wooden sculpture of a man.

After months of searching, the fourth annual Tiny Desk Contest winner has been announced!

I went from really loving the music of Superorganism to being a transformed super-fan the moment they sent me an email ahead of their Tiny Desk performance asking, "is it okay if we [bring] inflatable whales when we play?" Now I feel like the kind of fan I was when I wore a yellow radiation suit to a Devo concert in 1978.

Ten years ago today — on April 22, 2008 — NPR Music published our first Tiny Desk concert. Laura Gibson was the inspiration, and the event that sparked the idea of concerts at my desk came from NPR Music's Stephen Thompson. He and I were at the SXSW Music Festival, at one of those lousy shows where the audience chatter was louder than the performer.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify or Apple Music playlist at the bottom of the page.

Matthew Yokobosky finds food inspirational — which is perhaps not entirely surprising, considering that as an art curator, it's his job to make connections between seemingly disparate objects, just as a chef creates a cohesive dish out of contrasting ingredients.

So when New York City restaurateur and chef Saul Bolton suggested developing a themed menu and a series of dinners around the "David Bowie Is" exhibition now on view at the Brooklyn Museum, Yokobosky was intrigued.

www.recordstoreday.com

April 21, 2018 marks the tenth year that artists and independently owned music stores have come together to offer various promotions, performances, and parties all centered around music, and the people who make, sell, consume and keep it in the forefront of our cultural psyche.

Fifty years ago, Johnny Cash performed at Folsom State Prison in Folsom, Calif. The January 1968 concert and live album it produced, At Folsom Prison, helped revitalize Cash's career, inspiring him to testify for prison reform and cementing his reputation as a voice for the downtrodden.

John Prine never really liked his singing voice. "The only reason I figured out I didn't like my old records to listen was I could hear how nervous I was, and how uncomfortable I was," the venerated musician says. "And who would want to sit around and listen to yourself being uncomfortable?"

Today, Prine is releasing The Tree of Forgiveness, his first album of new material in 13 years, to an audience that spans generations.

Plugged In: Music Picks From The Sounds Of Colorado College

Apr 11, 2018

Plugged In is a limited-run web series for 91.5 KRCC Music in which contributors from Colorado College's student radio station, The SOCC, tip us off to great new releases, under-the-radar favorites, and other music they can't live without. 

Jake Brownell / 91.5 KRCC

On this week's episode of Air Check, local audiophile and music enthusiast Chris O'Shea sits in on the musical roundtable discussion, Low Cut Connie talks with Vicky and plays a couple songs in studio, and we suggest a few concerts that we think you might enjoy attending in the near future.   

Many songwriters have absorbed and reflected on the angst of 2018, and Laura Veirs is no exception. But what a welcome feat of alchemy she performs. The title track from her new album, The Lookout, picks up threads of unease and alienation, then weaves them into a tight, sunny tribute to Veirs' husband, the producer Tucker Martine.

Photo by Jessica Williams

Frankie Cosmos will be under the spotlights this Friday evening at the Black Sheep in Colorado Springs. The band is gaining in notoriety, and was recently featured on NPR's Weekend Edition with Scott Simon.

via Facebook

 

Gwen Wolfenbarger is a Colorado Springs-based musician who studies music at Colorado College and releases ethereal ambient soundscapes under the alias, Seal Eggs. Wolfenbarger's music explores the themes of physicality, emotional attachment, and isolation through sonic layering of harmonies, synth sounds, with the occasional harp glissando -- an homage to her primary instrument.

The first track I heard from the forthcoming Okkervil River record In The Rainbow Rain, out April 27, was "Famous Tracheotomies." It's a name-dropping song exploring the medical histories of various celebrities and it's a song that only Will Sheff could write.

Something's askew in "Oh Baby," the suspiciously peppy second single off Hot Chip member Alexis Taylor's upcoming, Tim Goldsworthy-produced album Beautiful Thing.

With a production assist from his Hot Chip partner-in-crime Joe Goddard, and band members on the track, it scans as a rollicking alternate-universe reincarnation of the electronic music class clowns as a power-pop group.

The National Library of Congress has shared its latest batch of musical inductees to the National Recording Registry. The 25 works — a mix of singles, field recordings, albums and soundtracks — represent myriad genres and time periods, and bring the Registry's overall catalog up to 500 entries.

Around a year ago, a group of women connected within the NPR universe started having a conversation about music. We had a plan to make a list, one that would challenge decades-old assumptions about what and who matters most in popular music. Our idea was a simple one: Put women at the center, instead of just including a few somewhere around number seven or 32.

Soul music savant Leon Bridges has announced a new album, Good Thing, and with it, two new tracks.

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