All Things Considered with Mike Procell

Monday through Friday 4-6:30 PM

Every weekday, KRCC's All Things Considered features breaking news, stories and reports from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. 

Mike Procell delivers reports and newscasts from the KRCC and CPR Newsrooms which feature stories and updates from all around Colorado, including coverage from the Colorado State Capitol.

With coronavirus cases continuing to climb and hospitals facing the prospect of having to decide how to allocate limited staff and resources, the Department of Health and Human Services is reminding states and health care providers that civil rights laws still apply in a pandemic.

States are preparing for a situation when there's not enough care to go around by issuing "crisis of care" standards.

But disability groups are worried that those standards will allow rationing decisions that exclude the elderly or people with disabilities.

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Around the country, doctors are facing a difficult question. If resources are limited, will they be asked to decide whose life will be saved? A federal civil rights office issued some guidance today, and NPR's Joseph Shapiro is here to tell us about it.

Hi, Joe.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Michel.

MARTIN: So what did you learn? And why did the Department of Health and Human Services think there was a need to issue the guidelines today?

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6 hours ago

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Around the country, doctors are facing a difficult question. If resources are limited, will they be asked to decide whose life will be saved? A federal civil rights office issued some guidance today, and NPR's Joseph Shapiro is here to tell us about it.

Hi, Joe.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Michel.

MARTIN: So what did you learn? And why did the Department of Health and Human Services think there was a need to issue the guidelines today?

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Around the country, doctors are facing a difficult question. If resources are limited, will they be asked to decide whose life will be saved? A federal civil rights office issued some guidance today, and NPR's Joseph Shapiro is here to tell us about it.

Hi, Joe.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Michel.

MARTIN: So what did you learn? And why did the Department of Health and Human Services think there was a need to issue the guidelines today?

A host of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour takes a look at how the coronavirus is affecting cultural production — and offers some recommendations for home entertainment.

NPR's business correspondent addresses listener concerns about retail workers and talks about about best practices for consumers as the coronavirus epidemic worsens.

NPR's business correspondent answers listener questions about economic sectors that are booming, working in retail and supporting small businesses in the middle of the coronavirus emergency.

Most of the gargantuan sum of money in the coronavirus bill Congress just passed is dealing with the economic crisis, not the public health one.

"Most of the bill is on emergency relief to people and unemployment insurance," says Loren Adler, associate director of USC-Brookings Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy. "The health care provisions are, in some sense, secondary."

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The $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill contains a lot of help for a lot of industries, but what's in there for health care? NPR health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin gives us the highlights.

SELENA SIMMONS-DUFFIN, BYLINE: Most of that gargantuan sum of money is dealing with the economic crisis here, not the public health one, going to things like emergency relief for various industries, unemployment insurance and the like. For health, the biggest-ticket item is $100 billion for hospitals and health care providers.

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The nation's 15 days of social distancing are nearly over. And while many states have issued stay-at-home orders for much longer periods of time, new guidance from the White House coronavirus task force is due soon.

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The toll of the coronavirus pandemic is steep - hundreds of thousands of confirmed infections around the world, tens of thousands of lives lost.

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We are all cooped up at home a lot now.

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Oh, yeah. And with gyms closed, it can be really hard to get in your regular workouts. So we asked experts for tips on staying active while hunkering down.

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For 6-year-old Sadie Hernandez, the first day of online school started at her round, wooden kitchen table in Jacksonville, Fla. She turned on an iPad and started talking to her first grade teacher, Robin Nelson.

"Are you ready to do this online stuff?" her teacher asks, in a video sent to NPR by Hernandez's mother, Audrey.

"Yeah," Sadie responds.
"It's kind of scary isn't it?"
"Kind of."

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President Trump has been widely criticized for his use of a certain phrase.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We continue our relentless effort to defeat the Chinese virus.

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Updated at 8:19 p.m. ET

A family of old antimalarial drugs — including one that some patients rely on to treat their lupus or rheumatoid arthritis — is becoming harder to get in the United States, pharmacists say, partly because of remarks President Trump has made, highlighting the drugs as a potential treatment for COVID-19.

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People with disabilities are asking the federal government to stop what they say are policies by states and hospitals that will ration care and deny them treatment for the coronavirus. NPR investigative correspondent Joseph Shapiro reports.

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