growth

Developers are struggling to build enough houses and apartments to keep up with the population boom in the Mountain West, according to new U.S. Census Bureau data released last week.

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According to the Census Bureau, Western towns with fewer than 5000 people have grown on average in recent years. Meanwhile, populations in similar sized towns in the Northeast and Midwest have gotten smaller.

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The city of Colorado Springs is holding a general election for mayor on April 2, 2019. There are four candidates in the race. 91.5 KRCC's Andrea Chalfin spoke with each of them, and condensed the interviews into the following highlights, including discussions on homelessness, the future of the city, and public safety, among other topics.

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The Mountain West has some of the fastest aging populations in the country, which could have some serious implications for the region's economy. 

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Over the past decade or so, the Mountain West has seen rapid population growth, but there are parts of the region that are slowing down.

Elizabeth Garner, the State Demographer for Colorado, said that for a while the Mountain West has had the advantage of lower costs and more space. But since 2015, Colorado’s growth rate has been declining, which means that “we’re still increasing, just by not as many,” said Garner.

Maeve Conran

Water has always been a source of conflict in the arid West, but in recent years the conflict between agriculture and growing cities has escalated as both entities compete for this limited resource. KGNU’s Maeve Conran has this story as part of our year long series Connecting the Drops.