trees

Annie Haigler steps out of her home in Louisville, Ky., pulling a handkerchief out of her pocket to dab sweat off her forehead. She enjoys sitting on her porch, especially to watch the sunrise. She has always been a morning person.

But as the day progresses, the heat can be unbearable for her. On summer days like this, when highs reach into the 90s, the lack of trees in her neighborhood is hard for Haigler to ignore.

"That's what I'm accustomed to trees doing: They bring comfort. You don't notice it, you don't think about it. But they bring comfort to you," she says.

NYC Parks

A recent study shows planting a trillion trees worldwide might be one of our best options for fighting climate change. 

Colorado Springs Finishes Tree Canopy Assessment

Feb 7, 2019
City of Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs has completed its first ever Tree Canopy Assessment.

The city used aerial imagery to map its trees and found that the canopy covers roughly 17 percent of Colorado Springs. The study also identified parts of the city that could benefit from more trees, including parks, medians, and the area surrounding a planned sports complex and the under-construction Olympic Museum near downtown Colorado Springs.

Walking through forests across the Mountain West, you might not realize you’re walking past historical artifacts big enough to crush you. These artifacts are pine and cedar trees that have had their bark peeled off in a special way. The trees are a bit of a mystery to archaeologists, and one they’re running out of time to solve.

https://pg-cloud.com/ColoradoSpringsCO/

Picture the street where you live. Now imagine that same street without any trees. Just homes, maybe a sidewalk, asphalt. Does that change your perception? Dennis Will thinks it would. He’s the interim city forester for the Colorado Springs Parks and Recreation Department.