USGS

You may have missed it, but on Black Friday the federal government released a second climate-related report. The United States Geologic Survey (USGS) found nearly one-quarter of carbon dioxide emissions come from fossil fuels extracted on public lands - that's the average from 2005 to 2014. Not to mention over 7 percent of methane and 1.5 percent of nitrous oxide, on average during that same time period.

USGS

A national crowd-sourcing project from the U.S. Geological Survey that began in Colorado is offering map enthusiasts an extra incentive to contribute to the National Map during International Map Year.
 


Thursday Newscast, 8/20/15, 5:32 PM

Aug 20, 2015

Newscast for Thursday, August 20, 2015, 5:32 PM:

  • According to a new state study, Colorado has a significant shortage of hospital beds for people suffering from mental illness and has increased needs for people behind bars.
     
  • A 3.9 magnitude earthquake shook Las Animas County last night, with an epicenter about 24 miles west of Trinidad.

USGS: Ogallala Groundwater Levels Continue to Decline

Dec 16, 2014

The U.S Geological Survey says the High Plains Aquifer, also known as the Ogallala, is losing groundwater likely due to increased groundwater pumping. 

The USGS released a report detailing an 8% decline between the years of 1950 and 2011. The overall average water-level declined about 15.4 feet. Between 2011 and 2013, the overall water level declined 2.1 feet.

Land near the Colorado-New Mexico border has recently been caving inwards in an area where a 5.3 magnitude earthquake took place in 2011. As KRCC’s Dana Cronin reports, scientists at the United States Geological Survey are pointing to wastewater disposal as a potential trigger.
 

Higher magnitude earthquakes are a rarity in Colorado, making the 2011 quake of special interest to scientists. Research showed a possible cause as wastewater injection which involves the pumping of large volumes of fluid into the Earth, creating high-pressure conditions.

Sally King / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A new study released by the U.S. Geological Survey looks at the effects of climate change on certain species in the American Southwest.  KRCC’s Eliza Densmore reports.
 

The study focuses on twelve bird and reptile species in the southwest and how they’re expected to endure changes in breeding ranges and habitats.