Sand Creek

National Archives and Records Administration

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed in February 1848, bringing an official end to the Mexican-American War. Among other things, it moved the southern boundary of the U.S. to the Rio Grande River, instead of the Arkansas River. Part of the original treaty is on display at the El Pueblo History Museum in Pueblo.

History professor Dr. Fawn Amber Montoya coordinates Chicano Studies at Colorado State University-Pueblo. 91.5 KRCC's Abigail Beckman spoke with Montoya about the implications of the treaty, which drastically changed the lives of the people living in this region.

Stormwater Channel Could Double as a Fat Bike Trail

Dec 2, 2016
Greg Smith / Flickr

As the city works to stabilize the Sand Creek stormwater channel, engineers are looking for creative ways to make the structures even more useful. One idea is to create a trail for fat bikes. Those have particularly wide tires that can traverse sand and leave little impact.

Tuesday Newscast, 12/1/15, 5:32 PM

Dec 1, 2015

Newscast for Tuesday, December 1, 2015, 5:32 PM:

Bente Birkeland / RMCR

Governor John Hickenlooper has apologized on behalf of the state of Colorado for the Sand Creek Massacre. The Massacre happened in the early morning of November 29th, 1864.  U.S. Calvary soldiers converged on a sleeping group of mostly women, children and elderly Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians. The 150 year-old event is one of the most notable incidents of violence against Native Americans in the history of the west.
 

A commemoration of the Sand Creek Massacre took place today at the Capitol. KRCC’s Tucker Hampson reports.
 

150 years ago on the eastern plains of Colorado, the US Army, led by Col. John Chivington, killed by some estimates 200 Cheyenne and Arapahoe, mostly women and children. Today at the Capitol was the final day of a healing ceremony, where Governor John Hickenlooper publicly apologized for the massacre.