history

Courtesy Pueblo County Historical Society

On Jan. 15, 1920 the city of Pueblo bought some 600 acres in the Wet Mountains about a half hour southwest of town. This forested land near Beulah became Pueblo Mountain Park.

Courtesy photo / Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum

The weather on Pikes Peak is unpredictable, especially in the midst of the Colorado winter. Wind chills of 50 degrees below zero and icy, snow swept slopes are the norm. But for the past 97 years, a group of determined mountaineers has made their way to the summit of the 14 thousand-plus-foot peak to carry on a special New Year’s tradition.

Abigail Beckman / 91.5 KRCC

When the pipes burst in her house near Colorado Springs’ Old North End, a local woman was heartbroken at having to tear out the original wood floor. But as Genesis De Leon pried up the floorboards and pushed away the dust, she found something intriguing underneath.

Ali Budner / 91.5 KRCC

An extraordinary discovery in the backyard of Colorado Springs has created a window into an evolutionary period we previously knew very little about.

  

It’s called America’s first extreme sport. It’s certainly old … and extreme. Each summer on the Fort Hall Reservation in southeastern Idaho, Shoshone Bannock tribal members gear up for Indian relay. KUER's Mountain West News Bureau reporter Nate Hegyi attended the event early this month with photojournalist Russel Daniels.  

Katie Lawrie / 91.5 KRCC

In a kick-off event Wednesday, Colorado Springs community leaders including Mayor John Suthers and City Council President Richard Skorman announced preparations for the city's 150th birthday. In the lead-up to a large-scale celebration in July of 2021, the city is encouraging businesses and community groups to plan for commemoratives and help organize events. 

About a century ago, African-American settlements sprang up across the West. Now, one of those sites in northern Colorado is set to host new houses.

The Black American West Museum, based in Denver, owns a number of properties in what used to be the town of Dearfield, Colorado. But a national homebuilding company, CMH Homes, Inc., also known as Clayton Homes, is now taking steps to turn other parts of the town into new residences.

The Top 5: A Look Back At Our Most Popular Stories Of 2018

Jan 1, 2019
Clockwise from top left: Georgina Owen/Colorado Department of Education; National Archives and Records Administration; Fortress Press; Jake Brownell/91.5 KRCC; Jake Brownell/91.5 KRCC

As 2019 gets underway, let’s take one last opportunity to revisit stories and interviews from 2018 that made a mark on you, our listeners and readers. 

Here are the top five local and regional stories that drew the most website traffic in 2018:

Creative Commons Zero - CC0 / Pixabay

If you own mineral rights to a piece of private property and an important dinosaur fossil is discovered there, do you own the fossil? A federal district court just ruled you do. 

During a State of the Nation Address last year, the President of the Philippines Rodrigo Duterte called on the U.S. "Give us back those Balangiga bells," said Duterte. "They are ours. They belong to the Philippines. They are part of our national heritage."

Colorado Historical Society / Wikimedia Commons

A Southern Colorado pioneer is set to be inducted into the Colorado Latino Hall of Fame this month. Maria Teresita Sandoval, an early settler in the area, is being recognized for her role in founding the city of Pueblo.

Walking through forests across the Mountain West, you might not realize you’re walking past historical artifacts big enough to crush you. These artifacts are pine and cedar trees that have had their bark peeled off in a special way. The trees are a bit of a mystery to archaeologists, and one they’re running out of time to solve.

National Archives and Records Administration

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed in February 1848, bringing an official end to the Mexican-American War. Among other things, it moved the southern boundary of the U.S. to the Rio Grande River, instead of the Arkansas River. Part of the original treaty is on display at the El Pueblo History Museum in Pueblo.

History professor Dr. Fawn Amber Montoya coordinates Chicano Studies at Colorado State University-Pueblo. 91.5 KRCC's Abigail Beckman spoke with Montoya about the implications of the treaty, which drastically changed the lives of the people living in this region.

Every summer, it takes a village to fight wildfires. For this upcoming season, we spoke with all kinds of people that lend a hand, from those on the frontlines, to others working a bit further back from the flames. For the Faces Behind the Fire series, Maggie Mullen talked to an archeologist with the U.S. Forest Service who helps decide what needs be preserved and what can be left to burn.


What Will Become Of Venetucci Farm?

May 16, 2018
Jake Brownell / 91.5 KRCC


Peak Curiosity is a community-driven reporting series from 91.5 KRCC. We ask listeners to submit their questions about the Pikes Peak region and Southern Colorado, and then we answer them. Scroll down to the bottom of this post to submit your question!

Pull out a map of the United States’ desert southwest and see if you can locate these rivers: Rio del Tizon, Rio San Rafael, or Rio Zanguananos. How about rivers named Tomichi, Nah-Un-Kah-Rea or Akanaquint?

Having some trouble? None of these names are used widely today, but at some point in the last 500 years they were used to label portions of what we know now as the Colorado River and its main tributaries, the sprawling river basin that supports 40 million people in seven U.S. states and Mexico, across one of the world’s driest regions.

Until 1921, the Colorado River didn’t start in the state that bears the same name. It began in Utah, where the Green River from Wyoming and the Grand River from Colorado met. The story of how the Colorado River finally wended its way into the state of Colorado less than a century ago is a lesson in just how fickle our attitudes toward nature can be.

Courtesy of Steelworks Center of the West, Pueblo, Colorado

David Rockefeller, Jr. will speak in Pueblo February 17 at a fundraiser for the Steelworks museum. It's the first time in 90 years that a Rockefeller has been to southern Colorado.

Courtesy of Special Collections, Pikes Peak Library District, 001-240

Peak Curiosity is a new, community-driven reporting series from 91.5 KRCC. We ask listeners to submit their questions about the Pikes Peak region and Southern Colorado, and then we answer them. Scroll down to the bottom of this post to submit your question!

courtesy Steelworks Center of the West's Steelworks Archives

A new documentary, Forging the West, looks at the 144-year story of Pueblo’s Colorado Fuel and Iron Company and its pivotal role in the development of the west.

Dedicating the Buffalo Soldiers Monument

Jul 28, 2016
Jake Brownell / KRCC

The year after the end of the Civil War, the U.S. Congress authorized the creation of six segregated African American army regiments. They were placed in the largely unsettled Rocky Mountain West, far from the southern states where many of them had been enslaved. More than 150 people attended a ceremony Thursday to commemorate this piece of Western history.

Remembering the Buffalo Soldiers 150 Years Later

Jul 27, 2016
Jake Brownell / KRCC

 

Thursday marks the 150th anniversary of the creation of the so-called Buffalo Soldier regiments of the U.S. Army. The segregated units, composed of African-American men, were formed just a year after the end of the Civil War, and played a role in the establishment of the American West. A local group has spent the last two years working to honor the soldiers and their contributions to American history.  

New Philadelphia Times, OH, July 18th, 1963 via Newspapers.com

Fifty three years ago this week, a 21-year-old rock-and-roll musician named Ulysses Baxter made history in Colorado Springs. On hands and knees, with a wooden salad spoon affixed to his nose, he ascended Pikes Peak--pushing a peanut the entire way.

Courtesy of the Pikes Peak Library District

 

In the mid-20th Century, a man named Robert LeFevre (pronounced Luh-FAVE) created a small mountain academy just north of Colorado Springs called The Freedom School. The school, and his teachings, played an important role in the popularization of libertarianism in America. They also helped shape the minds of some of the the most powerful men in American industry and politics, not the least of which were Charles and David Koch, aka The Koch Brothers--two of the wealthiest men in the world.

On this episode of Wish We Were Here we tell the nearly-forgotten story of LeFevre and his short-lived libertarian boot camp.

Chr. Barthelmess, photographer, Fort Keogh, Montana. / Library of Congress, Public Domain

The statehouse recently voted to commemorate four historical African American army units. 

A resolution to designate a portion of Highway 24 in Colorado Springs as the "Buffalo Soldiers Memorial Highway" passed unanimously in the state house and senate along with a recognition of the units' importance in the state's early history.

Bente Birkeland / RMCR

The Governor's commission studying American Indian representations in public schools released its report this week. The group recommends that public schools do not use American Indian mascots, but if they do, they should partner with a tribe to make sure it is done in a respectful way. Right now thirty Colorado schools use some type of American Indian mascot or imagery.

The commission went to four schools to bring American Indian and non-American Indian people together, community members, school boards, and students. This follows failed attempts at the statehouse to ban these types of mascots.

Jeffrey Beall / Flickr/Creative Commons

Two new sections of the Santa Fe Trail are now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  The segments are located within the Comanche National Grasslands in Otero County.

The specific sites were chosen because of the clear visibility of the original trail, says Michelle Stevens, a program manager for the Comanche National Grasslands.

Woodland Park Kicks Off 125th Anniversary

Jan 29, 2016
City of Woodland Park website

Woodland Park is kicking off its 125th anniversary celebration this weekend. The birthday celebration is expected to feature a chili luncheon as well as a presentation by historian Larry Black on the city’s past. There will be vintage photos of Woodland Park on display and attendees are invited to dress in period costumes.

PPLD Digital Photo Archive, image 001-5305

When you hear the name Ivywild these days, you likely think of the old school turned brewery and market just south of I-25 in Colorado Springs. But Ivywild, a whole neighborhood at the foot of the Broadmoor, was once a small suburb of Colorado Springs with a history as rich and colorful as any city in Colorado. Authors Molly Merry and Linda Johnson recently revived some of that history in a small book titled "Ivywild: A Treasure Filled Neighborhood History".

The Big Something Radio Programme, Episode 9

Oct 16, 2015

On this episode of The Big Something: filmmaker Nathan Ward discusses The Rider and the Wolf, his new documentary about the disappearance of Colorado Mountain Bike pioneer, Mike Rust; Representatives of the Colorado Springs Public Market talk about the past, present, and future of the Public Market project; Local author Molly Merry recounts colorful stories from Colorado Springs’ Ivywild Neighborhood; and we revisit an interview with Senga Nengudi in advance of her upcoming appearance at the Gallery of Contemporary Art.
 

Thursday Newscast, 9/10/15, 6:04 PM

Sep 10, 2015

Newscast for Thursday, September 10, 205, 6:04 PM:
 

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